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''theory is when you know everything but nothing works
practice is when everything works but none-one knows why
in our labs theory and practice are combined , nothing works and no one knows why''
...
(Mod blog of Ask Timebomb)

tasteforthetasteless:

Olivia Knapp-

donc-desole:

Progress gif of This

donc-desole:

Progress gif of This

(via chocolate-time-machine)

"Weird Al" Yankovic - Now That's What I Call Polka!

peashooter85:

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,

During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experience Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  

The Germans didn’t allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.

 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own buy cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.

The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.

chechula:

Saruman of Many Colours :3 ….i think he should looks like oil stamp….at least i like drawing him like this….

i need draw some proper picture with him…:3

(via chocolate-time-machine)

thingsmagazine:

O. Winston Link, NW792 Link and Thom with Night Flash Equipment, 1956

crlblck:

Soviet Space Program 1971

(via scientificillustration)

ponderpretties:

The Deer God is a breathtaking 3d pixel art game that will challenge your religion and your platforming skills.”

You play as a stag, it has pretty music and everything is so so pretty.
This game is beautiful and you should pledge on its kickstarter- it has only a month remaining!

(via chocolate-time-machine)

ignatzisunfunny:

Jonathan Swift: A Modest Proposal
http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/modest.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_modest_proposal
atlasobscura:

THE LAKE MONSTERS OF AMERICA
BY ALLISON MEIER / 22 NOV 2013
People love to fill in mysterious areas of nature with myths of monsters. Early maps had voids of knowledge marked with warnings that “Here be Dragons,” sasquatches are believed to be prowling the thick forests, and legends tell of strange creatures that might be concealed beneath the surface of our lakes. Here we present our map of American lake monsters (view it large here), showing the spread of cryptids that might be lurking in the depths of the waters of the United States.
Click here to view the whole map of the Lake Monsters of America, and perhaps discover what sea serpents and others nautical beasts might be lurking near you. If you would like even more monsters both mythical and real, check out our places around the world related to cryptozoology and fascinating fauna. 
Be sure to read the whole article at Atlas Obscura

atlasobscura:

THE LAKE MONSTERS OF AMERICA

BY ALLISON MEIER / 22 NOV 2013
People love to fill in mysterious areas of nature with myths of monsters. Early maps had voids of knowledge marked with warnings that “Here be Dragons,” sasquatches are believed to be prowling the thick forests, and legends tell of strange creatures that might be concealed beneath the surface of our lakes. Here we present our map of American lake monsters (view it large here), showing the spread of cryptids that might be lurking in the depths of the waters of the United States.
Click here to view the whole map of the Lake Monsters of America, and perhaps discover what sea serpents and others nautical beasts might be lurking near you. If you would like even more monsters both mythical and real, check out our places around the world related to cryptozoology and fascinating fauna
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINEOne of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.Normand

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINE

One of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.

Normand

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

rachelignotofsky:

First illustration in my Women in Science series. Get one for yourself here:
https://www.etsy.com/listing/196197246/women-in-science-marie-curie

rachelignotofsky:

First illustration in my Women in Science series. Get one for yourself here:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/196197246/women-in-science-marie-curie

(via chocolate-time-machine)